The “Massacre Camp” and the “Mis-encounter” Block

tromarfal

The Mamasapano tragic event where 44 Special Action Force met their demise seared into the nation’s consciousness, although for the n’th times, the Filipinos split into two camps with mixed reactions. To identify to which camp they belong – in the mainstream media or in the social networking sites – is on how they describe the fatal event: as a “massacre” or a “mis-encounter”.

The “massacre” block composed mostly of P’Noy bashers who at every opportunity, they could exploit, any slipshod they could spot or sense against P’Noy, they would dished it out with exaggeration in their platform. Their intent, of course, is either to weaken his Presidency, or to snuff out his influence, or purely for vengeance: because P’Noy had stepped on their toes. They are the army trollers of the internet whose mission in posting is to broadcast venom of negativity trending the minds of the netizens into their orbit. Any cataclysmic political event, just like demised of the “fallen 44”, if they could use this event to sow collective anger, they would salivate for an easy one-click stroke to instigate a mob rule, impeachment, or resignation. Most of these “massacre” camp people inflamed the parochial mentality of the Filipinos when they made an issue for example, of P’noy’s attending first to the inauguration of Mitsubishi Motors Corporation Plant, rather than give importance to the arrival honors of the “fallen 44”. However, on January 31, 2015, P’Noy talked to each of the families of the “fallen44” for eleven hours.

Massacre is a word that connotes revolting imagery. It renders one’s heart to exact revenge or inspires war. So apt for people who advocate dissension.

The “mis-encounter” camp, however, comprised mostly of people on an even keel, sober, and contemplative. They don’t usually get their emotions clouded their perception. They are of the pragmatic type scouring every angle of the situation. They confined their thoughts more on the future than nourishing the wounds of the past. Although the “mis-encounter” camp people seek justice, this shouldn’t be in the form of violence but of jurisprudence. Most important of all, they advocate peace. They desire that the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) would sail through amidst the temporary setback.

While the word massacre seems to exacerbate an already revolting situation, the word mis-encounter somewhat tames and balms the cruel weight of the fatal event.

Admittedly, there were lapses, misjudgment, and miscalculation why the botch “Oplan Wolverine” occurred. Immediately, the SAF’s Police Director Getulio Napenas, accepted the full responsibilities and was relieved of his post. Various investigation bodies had been formed and in the coming days all, these investigations will bear fruits.

The nation mourned for this unfortunate event. No one would like this to happen to the young full of promise “fallen44” combatants. However, their deaths will forever indebted the nation for their bravery and heroism, as they saved more lives killing, Marwan, the terrorist.

“Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong” as Murphy’s Law states. Maybe that’s supposed to happen right in the midst of BBL peace accord because this event could fine-tuned the peace provisions of the BBL.


To which kind of people do you belong? To the “massacre block” or to the “mis-encounter camp”?

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I am passionate about writing since I was 18 years old. Slowly, through the years, though sidetracks by other endeavors, my passion never wanes. My writing showed some progress, not as much in pecuniary form, but in psychic income. My writing started to have fruition when my opinion pieces, essays, short stories, ghost-writing graced in different publications. With the advent of ¨Blogs¨ of today’s technology, my writing made a leapfrog.

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Posted in Blog and social Media, Commentaries, Living in the Philippines, News and politics, Opinion, Philippine's Culture, Philippine's Politics

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